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(keitai-l) Re: Forrester: WI-FI is going to crash

From: Debi Jones <djones_at_wireless-one.org>
Date: 06/26/03
Message-ID: <0a0701c33b80$2e82e9d0$4074c33f_at_corp.palm.com>
Dirk,

The terminology can be confusing, but let's take a closer look.

There are terms specific to the network range or utility like:
PAN
WLAN
WAN

None of those terms specify what technology is used in that range.
PANs can be IR or Bluetooth or even Wi-Fi
WLANs can be Wi-Fi or microwave
WANs can be CDMA, GSM, or Wi-Fi

Are you equating peering with the software controlled mesh of Tropos
Networks
or does this mean something else to you?  While there are mesh networks for
consumer use like http://www.locustworld.com .  This is a completely
different
business model than those of Vivato, Cometa Networks or Tropos.

As for the importance of the type of connectivity I think that's truly an
issue of
application.  If I'm a traveling consultant my solution would look vastly
different
than the PDA solution for a dock worker of a trucking company.  There would
also be different requirements for the PDAs carried by a Federal Express
delivery person.

As for Wi-Fi being there, first.  Um, well what about CDPD?  Why wasn't it
a success?  The wireless operators were certainly around before Wi-Fi
products hit the market.  This is an important indicator.  End users found
Wi-Fi could be used to solve their problems.  Wi-Fi has also been a better
choice for extended corporate LANs and allowing more mobility within the
enterprise's geography.  Now, that some innovators are making this same
technology available at greater distances, it will continue to be attractive
for the same reasons, at least for data communications.

...Debi

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dirk Rösler" <dirkREMOVE_at_tkm.att.ne.jp>
To: <keitai-l_at_appelsiini.net>
Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 5:37 PM
Subject: (keitai-l) Re: Forrester: WI-FI is going to crash


>
> I'm completely with Benedict on this.
>
> Wi-Fi is a rather good technology, not great but quite versatile. It's
> just been there first and the time was right for wireless data.
> Obviously the designers didn't anticipate such success, otherwise they
> would have engineered other things in. But what part of the "L" in WLAN
> don't you understand?
>
> As for the peering, you must be joking. Trusting the link on to other
> users, it sounds frightening. I think above all users value reliability
> of the link over speed. Reliability is rightly seen as a given. Speed
> is a bonus. The traditional voice carriers have a lot of expertise and
> experience in this area.
>
> With PDAs it's even more important to roam/be continuously connected
> simply because the device is smaller and people are more likely to be
> connected while moving physically. Distinguish between true mobile and
> nomadic.
>
> Dirk
>
>
> This mail was sent to address djones_at_wireless-one.org
> Need archives? How to unsubscribe? http://www.appelsiini.net/keitai-l/
>
Received on Thu Jun 26 04:18:25 2003