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(keitai-l) Re: SIM and J2ME

From: Arjen van Blokland <arjen104_at_yahoo.co.jp>
Date: 09/24/03
Message-ID: <20030924025627.54967.qmail_at_web706.mail.yahoo.co.jp>
Yes, corporate data!
Here is the market for synchronization over the mobile
network. 

Arjen van Blokland 
104.com

 --- Gerhard Fasol <fasol_at_eurotechnology.com> からのメッ
セージ:
> 
> On the other hand, phones in Japan now come with up
> to 128Mbyte
> removable storage media + a lot of built in memory.
> What's the point of having the phone book (and your
> picture album,
> and your other personal data) on a central server
> when you have
> 128++ Mbyte storage in your handset here and now
> with no
> latency and no connection problems?
> 
> Central servers are for things like airplane
> reservation systems,
> corporate data, weather forecast etc.
> 
> I think "thin phones" will go the way of the
> "network computer",
> you remember the hype, that PCs will be replaced by
> thin clients,
> and all computing will be on central servers...
> 
> Gerhard
> 
> 
> Bill Volk wrote:
> > In the USA, some of the carriers have cheap (AT&T)
> or even flat rate
> > data plans (T-Mobile).
> > 
> > I suspect that this trend will spread.
> > 
> > Historically, any commodity will eventually reach
> a reasonable profit
> > margin .. because competitors will see cutting
> prices on these services
> > as a way of gaining market share.
> > 
> > I really don't see $0.10 per. line text messaging
> holding out too long
> > either.
> > 
> > In our case, our multiplayer games and chat
> systems don't use that much
> > bandwidth ... but as we bring richer experiences
> onto the handsets .. we
> > will need to move more data.
> > 
> > Bill Volk
> > Teknik
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: keitai-l-bounce_at_appelsiini.net
> > [mailto:keitai-l-bounce_at_appelsiini.net] On Behalf
> Of Gerhard Fasol
> > Sent: Tuesday, September 23, 2003 6:10 PM
> > To: keitai-l_at_appelsiini.net
> > Subject: (keitai-l) Re: SIM and J2ME
> > 
> > 
> > Chris,
> > 
> > this is all nice in theory, but I don't think this
> works in real
> > life -
> > 
> > and also it's based on yesterday's non-internet
> phone experience
> > as it is still widespread outside advanced mobile
> countries like
> > Japan or S-Korea:
> > 
> > (a) do you like to pay data charges to the carrier
> every time you update
> > your personal phone book?
> > 
> > (b) do you like to pay data charges everytime you
> show your
> > personal photo album to a friend
> > 
> > (c) in reality (in advanced mobile countries)
> people store a LOT
> > more than the phone book in their mobile phone:
> 100s of emails,
> > 100s of photographs of kids, friends, holidays,
> parties, melodies, etc.
> > People don't want to pay data charges everytime
> they go through their
> > personal photo album, and they want to be able to
> show the personal
> > photoalbum even if they are not connected to the
> carrier network
> > 
> > (d) when you are in the subway, do you want to
> have to wait for the
> > next station, where your phone connects, to write
> an email on your
> > phone? No: you want to be able to type
> continuously whether you
> > are connected or not.
> > 
> > My response to this thin-phone-client-idea: forget
> it.
> > 
> > Gerhard
> > 
> > 
> > Chris Wooldridge wrote:
> > 
> >>An alternative route to achieve the same end goal
> is for the network
> > 
> > to
> > 
> >>become the phone interface.  
> >>
> >>The idea is that the handset is essentially a
> thin-client.  The actual
> >>interface displayed on the handset by this thin
> client is under the
> > 
> > control
> > 
> >>of a server based application that is in turn
> controlled by the
> > 
> > operator.
> > 
> >>Thus, you get the concept of a thin phone.
> >>
> >>>From this concept, it is a small step to having a
> network managed
> > 
> > phonebook,
> > 
> >>a network managed bookmark list, and a network
> managed personalised
> > 
> > list of
> > 
> >>my applications.  The key to success from a
> technical point of view is
> > 
> > the
> > 
> >>generic nature of the thin client application and
> the ubiquity of
> > 
> > network
> > 
> >>connectivity and the balance between what is on
> the phone and in the
> >>network.  I can't place a call unless I have a
> network, so it does not
> >>really matter if my phone book is stored in the
> network itself.
> > 
> > However, I
> > 
> >>will always want Ridge Racer to be stored and run
> locally on the
> > 
> > handset.
> > 
> >>Once you get the basic structure in place,
> networked applications can
> > 
> > be
> > 
> >>incrementally added to the handset menu.  
> >>
> >>Who owns the server applications including your
> address book: the
> > 
> > operator.
> > 
> >>It makes changing network just that little bit
> more of a pain in the
> > 
> > butt.
> > 
> >>Bullant http://www.bullant.com.au/ has been
> pushing this idea for a
> > 
> > couple
> > 
> >>of years now.  Other startups like Cognima
> http://www.cognima.com/ are
> >>moving in the direction of network managed handset
> database
> > 
> > replication.
> > 
> >>I am sure there are plenty of others...
> >>
> >>Chris
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> 
=== message truncated ===


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Received on Wed Sep 24 05:55:40 2003